PDA

View Full Version : Where were you that day? Sept 11



somenavyguy
09-08-2011, 11:35 PM
I'll start this off. I was in "A" school. I'd already graduated boot camp and was in training to learn to work on airplanes. I was in my 4th week of class. Going through our lesson one of our chief'f knocked on the door and ushered all us us into the atrium. A large lobby in the Airwing building of Pensacola FL naval air training center. Old rebuilt airplanes hung from the ceiling like any aviation museium and the "bridge" that goes across was lines with all higher ranking people. They gave us the news and dismissed us from class to our barracks. We sat there in the lounges all crowed around the TV getting more pissed as we were shocked btw. Now 10 years later it still feels the same. It's been long, hard and crappy but I'm glad I joined before the war just as much as I've been apart of it. I know all the people I've worked with the past 10 years feel the same. I was Talking to my best friend Sgt Holmes who was ex infantry and been in combat for years and from his marine side to my navy side it still feels right to us. (Holmes is now aviation with me)

I didn't post this for any extra recognition first and for most but if it was ever gonna get start and I felt it shoudl I want to have a part in it so I started it. Night guys be home for good next April.

Toronto
09-09-2011, 12:33 AM
I was starting to date my eventual wife. Working for an IT company 3 months away from declaring bankruptcy...Anyways...I am eating breakfast and see on TV one of the towers smoking, but the chatter was about a small plane. I left to go to work (downtown Toronto, which was a 45 minute drive. By the time I got to work, the towers (IIRC) were about to collapse and the internet was completely down. I ended up leaving my office, went to my gym across the street and watched on a small tv with about 20 others what had happened. You've never seen 20 more confused and scared middle aged professionals in your life.

Whe I got to my girlfriend's apt that day, (Downtown Toronto was evacuated) we went to try and donate blood. In about the only funny thing I can recall, I was refused because I had been to the dentist recently, and for whatever reason, that disquallified me.

An awful disgusting day, and I will NEVER forget the images in NYC, or in Gaza of people celebrating. Both images enraged and saddened me, all in one blow.

Bobcat
09-09-2011, 01:01 AM
Four months out of high school and basically two months past my 18th birthday, I was at home after sleeping in, planning on going in to work at noon. I'd taken the year off from attending college since I knew I was having gastric-bypass surgery in December but wasn't sure when. Didn't want to have the surgery fall in the middle of finals week or anything so I just took the whole year off to be safe.

I was actually still laying in bed and had just turned the TV on about 10 minutes after the first plane struck, and from that point on I was basically glued to the TV. Finally around 11:30 I managed to get myself going, but instead of going in to work I drove to the clinic to donate blood, knowing that would be my contribution if nothing else. Work could wait.

Never went in to work, but also never got in trouble for not showing. My boss just happened to be a few people in front of me at the clinic, obviously with the same idea as I had. We exchanged a glance, a nod, and a smile, and that was all it took to basically get me off the hook for lack of a better term. When the pay period came around the next Friday he put me down for eight hours anyway. His rationale was I earned eight hours for standing in line for 45 minutes to give blood. My bank account didn't argue, though I did take half those wages for that day and put in an envelope for the Red Cross.

Went back home, made some lunch, and basically sat in front of the TV until probably 2 or 3 in the morning.

Went and gave blood on September 13 as well, completely ignoring the "restrictions" they had in place for doing that. They could use it more than I could in situations like that.

Never going to forget that day.

God bless those souls who lost their lives that day, and their families who still grieve to this day.

And Godspeed to those who risk their lives on a daily basis to keep something like this from happening again.

TitansJonne
09-09-2011, 01:26 AM
i was in 6th grade i believe. It was still dark outside. I remember i woke up but stayed in my bed while i listened to my mom on the phone with someone. She was talking and me being little, thought nothing of it. Then all of a sudden she said "Damn! another one hit!" I had no idea what was going on. Just that it was bad. I admit though, me being only 10-11 at the time, it took me a few years to fully understand what happened. When i went to bootcamp last year, the RDC put on a video and said "this is why we do it". It was a video of the planes hitting. And a little girl in the background reading a letter she wrote to her dead father. Telling him how she missed him rubbing her belly. The entire barracks was shaking. 40 men in one room crying yet no one seemed sad. More angry if anything. At that point, i literally felt i could kill a man. Somenavyguy, i thank you for your service. One thing i have learned is that you guys don't do it for money or for recognition. The one thing they teach you at boot is that it's not about you, its about the man beside you. You guys are selfless and if the world was full of men and women like you, it would be perfect.

Sect309Fan
09-09-2011, 07:58 AM
I was at work that morning (same company as now, but I was in the basement then), and I got a phone call from my best friend. He told me that a plane had crashed into one of the twin towers, so I searched the internet to find out more.

At the time, I think most everyone felt like this was some terrible accident. I didn't even realize that it was a jet that crashed; I thought it was likely a small plane. But it didn't take long for the second plane to crash. Then the Pentagon was hit.

At that point, I don't think anyone at my company was working. There were tv sets on each floor, and everyone just went out there to watch. It was memorizing yet horrible at the same time. Seeing the flames and people jumping out the windows was bad, but when the towers were collapsing, it was so heartbreaking. We were hearing that 50,000 people might have been killed, but at least it was only about a 10th of that.

I think my company let us go home early that day, but I doubt I will ever forget about it.

SouthSide Titan
09-09-2011, 10:38 AM
I was off that day and I had just woke up and as usual,the first thing I did was turn on the news. I was still half sleep but I remember seeing smoke from the towers.At first I thought it was just a fire but then I sat up and read the news ticker underneath...I was shocked.I was speechless and wasn't sure what to do.Just frozen in time.

MrBean
09-09-2011, 10:59 AM
My wife woke me up with the news. I always would sleep in another half an hour while she used the bathroom in our apartment to get ready in the morning.

Now, my wife is always saying stuff into tricking me to get up (she hates it that I can sleep in. She simply can't.) So I groggily started to get up and I told her, "Honey, that's not even the slightest bit fun..." and then I saw the tears in her eyes. So I went and looked at the news. I know I was numb the entire day. My wife's favorite uncle is in the secret service and was in one of the small towers, and no one in the family had heard a word from him.

He ended up being okay, but we didn't hear from him for two days. He was too busy with security and clean up details.

Yvette
09-09-2011, 12:24 PM
I was hanging out on the TOMB, still griping about the loss against the Phins, before going to do my Tuesday volunteer gig. For about an hour and a half we posted back and forth with each other before having nothing left to say.

One of the elderly ladies I saw that day was 100 years old. She traveled down memory lane, telling me all the milestones she'd seen in her lifetime. She said she never thought she'd see another Pearl Harbor, but damn if it wasn't happening again. She was my last house that day and I stayed for a couple of hours, watching news updates with her. She'd lived through just about everything it seemed, and I felt comforted being with her. She never showed anger, just sadness, and she kept me calm. My anger would come later.

I felt like my perfectly imperfect world was shattered. I grew up surrounded by crime, I wasn't naive by a long shot, but this was different. Every bit of false security I felt was gone in an instant.

I've been watching and reading 9/11 recaps for the last week. I know what's going to happen, I know it's going to hurt, and I can't look away. I won't ever forget, it's a matter of honor, but it's also about vigilance for me now. I feel I owe that to the victims and their loved ones, and all who willingly sacrifice(d) their safety for mine.

Parddy
09-09-2011, 12:53 PM
I spent from 8:45am until around 10:30am on the TOMB in Poohka's World Trade Center thread. I watched it unfold via the Titans website. I will never forget that morning...

When the second tower fell we were all allowed to leave and be with our families. To be honest I remember vividly posting and learning about it as it happened on the TOMB... But from that afternoon, and for about the next 3 months it was all a blur. I was consumed by the news on a daily basis there for awhile, almost obsessed with it.... Did that happen to anybody else?

I was scheduled to fly to Nashville on Sept 15th for the Bengal game.......... By Friday all flights had just started to resume...... But appropriately the NFL cancelled the game.

Titan723
09-09-2011, 05:06 PM
I slept during the whole thing. I had stayed up late the night before watching a movie. I woke up about 11:30am on 9/11 after everything had occured. I turned on the tv and the first image I saw was one of the towers collasping. Being a movie channel, I figured it was just a movie. I then turned the channel and realised what had happened. Like most people I spent the afternoon and night watching coverage of the events.
One thing that does stick out for me is a trip to Walmart I made that afternoon. I had nothing to eat so made a quick trip to the store. The tvs in the store that normally play advertisements were showing coverage of the events. I had never heard a grocery store so silent in my life. You could hear a pin drop in there.

Hammr
09-09-2011, 09:37 PM
I was on my beer route when it was anounced on the radio, when I got into the store I went right to the TV it was on the news and the owner was steadily talking to me but all I could hear was the news cast. When the second plane hit all I could think was "I'm out of position" I should have still been in and now when I was needed I wasn't. what a **** feeling that was

Old Oilers Fan
09-10-2011, 06:09 AM
I was doing some running for work when I heard a plane hit the tower. I thought what the hell? I was close to home so I stopped and turn on the TV in time to see the second plane hit. I thought how did they catch it on camera? Then they said it was a second plane. That was when the worst feeling of helpless came over me. The biggest part of the day was even stranger because I live next to Dayton Airport and Wright-Patterson Air Force base all my life. Not hearing a plane was hard to explain. Around 6pm that night I seen five jets followed by what I think was Air Force 1 then four more jets fly over very high in the sky. Like Hammr at that moment I wished I was still in the Army to do my part.

GOD BLESS OUR SERVICE MEN AND WOMEN FROM PAST TO PRESENT. :toast

RIP TO ALL THOSE WHO BECAME VICTIMS TO THIS TRAGEDY I WILL NEVER FORGET. :(

UNITED WE WILL STAND.

kytitansfan1
09-10-2011, 10:58 AM
I was at work and didn't know anything was happening until my asst. came in and said that a plane had crashed into one of the towers. Minutes after turning on a radio the 2nd tower was hit. We knew then that this was no accident. The mall I worked in then closed early that day and we, I was married at the time, could not get to our children fast enough. I saw the images of the tragedy for the first time at about 1:30 that afternoon. Shock, then sadness, then anger washed over me.

This weekend I am proudly flying our flag, a flag flown over a military base and sent to me by my oldest son while he was in Afghanistan.

zonian
09-10-2011, 11:53 AM
I was in the building drinking a cup of coffee and watching the morning news broadcast as was the normal routine at the business where I worked at the time, when the picture changed to a live feed from NY and we had our first look at what was transpiring.

We all sat there in awe as we witnessed the second plane collide live on TV as we were watching.

I don't remember the rest of the day.

There are no words to describe the feelings that I have to this day.

I have been banned from message boards for trying to express them...

kytitansfan1
09-10-2011, 02:27 PM
Very soon after 9/11, many companies were trying to capitalize on the strong wave of patriotism that was sweeping over the country. I was working for a TN based home decor retailer at the time. In one of our shipments, among the flags and lapel pins we received was a quantity of floor mats. These floor mats were emblazoned with an image of the American flag. When I saw this I called the CEO (founder) of the company and told him there was no way I was going to put something like this on my sales floor because I would not have anyone wiping their feet on the American flag. The following day we were instructed to destroy the mats. The day after that I learned that the person responsible for purchasing those floor mats was terminated.

Mike McFan
09-10-2011, 06:56 PM
We were all gathered at my Mother's to plan my Dad's funeral. He had passed on the 10th. Came on the television in the living room.

Orca
09-10-2011, 07:00 PM
I was at a military facility in DC. We could see the smoke from our location.

315
09-11-2011, 06:11 AM
I was doing a job just a few miles from home. My SIL called me and told me to turn on the radio. As I listened I remember trying to decide if I wanted to go get my kids out of school.

The laborers that were working with me didn't understand the scope of what was going on and were getting pissed cause I was glued to the truck radio and not helping them. We worked for about an hour and I sent them home and went home myself and sat there completely numb watching the TV

SwissTitansFan
09-11-2011, 08:34 AM
A day I'll never forget......I was in Switzerland preparing some mixes for recording in my basement and the TV was on the news channel with no sound (at that time we only had CNN International)....I saw the "Breaking News" coming up and saw how the first tower burned....I thought first, it was a terrible accident and then I saw the second plane hit the other tower....I knew, it was an attack.....I was in a state of shock....I probably didn't sleep for the next 48 hours...watching and following all the news on TV and net....

t1tan5
09-11-2011, 11:07 AM
I was in math class when the vice-principal walked in the class room and whispered something to the teacher. Our teacher was always monotone in class, and even when he learned of and told us of the event, he stayed calm. That really helped us all keep an even keel as we walked over to the neighbouring class room (which had a TV with cable hook up). I will never forget Aaron Brown narrating the events live from across the river. I don't remember if I saw the second plane hit one of the towers (maybe I blocked it out), but I do remember watching as both towers fell to the ground in a cloud of toxic dust. I couldn't believe what my eyes were seeing. On the way home, I was really scared that something like that could happen to us even if we were in Canada. I really appreciate my parents and teachers for staying calm in front of the kids because I know they were thinking the same things I was, but maintained their composure so as not to instill panic in us. I guess that's the one life lesson I drew from 9/11. Staying calm in the face of danger and uncertainty is paramount.

Livid13
11-10-2011, 12:52 PM
I was playing in a golf tournament when the cell phones started blowing up. I STILL am amazed that we finished our round AFTER seeing the towers going down at the turn. It's nothing that I'm proud of, believe me. What STUNNED me was the afternoon group that showed up to play their round. I still had yet to realize the signficance of that day and felt sick to my stomach. IT also happens to be Screwy and my wedding anniversary. We do NOT go out and celebrate.....